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Map Of Ireland

This heraldic map of Ireland shows the locations of over thirteen hundred clans and families. The detail and artwork are exceptional

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Price: £19.99

Approximate US dollar price: $31.73

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Delivery: 2/3 weeks to USA

The map measures 14 x 23 inches and shows the locations of over thirteen hundred clans and families, some of which go back over a thousand years. Gaelic, Anglo Norman and Norse names predominate with later additions of Welsh, Scots and English elements. Also featured are miniature illustrations of St. Patrick, and the castles of Bunratty and Dunluce.

Also featured are County boundaries, main rivers, mountains and glens and principal cities and towns and the Crests of Ulster, Munster, Leinster and Connaught.

This is an exquisite work of art,printed on high quality paper and is ready for framing. It will appeal to both historians and genealogists alike. It is posted in a strong protective tube and we offer a lifetime guarantee.It will enhance any home where the family is proud of its Irish heritage


Irish surnames derive from a medley of origins, representing Gaelic, Nordic, Anglo-Norman, Welsh, Scots and English strains which have intermingled for over fifteen hundred years. Historically, Ireland was one of the first countries in Europe to re-establish surnames after the disintegration of the Roman Empire.

The oldest names are Gaelic, usually preceeded by the famous`O`meaning `Grandson of` and `Mac` meaning `son of`. Thus we find, amongst others;
O`Neill, O`Brien, O`Connor, O`Donnell, O`Grady, and McCarthy, McGuiness, and Macmurrough. Many of these names are descriptive, either of physical appearance or character.E.G. Reilly (brave), Quinn( intelligent), Kennedy (helmeted), Coneely (courageous), Dempsey (proud), Sullivan (black-eyed)and O`Toole (mighty-people).

The anglo-Saxon invasions in the twelfth century injected a new strain which, added to the earlier Viking incursions, complicated the picture still further. Interestingly, The Irish Department of Foreign Affairs states that over 50% of the Irish population belongs to blood group`O`, directly linking that population to Nordic origins.

Saint Patrick Featured on the map of Ireland.

Dunluce Castle Featured on the map of Ireland.

Many of these Norman names were actually referring to place names in Northern France or in Wales (Walsh) that the invaders came from. For example Cusack (Cussac) Lyons (Lyons) De Lacey (Lacey) Joyce (Jose) and French.

Other names refer to original occupations: Falconer, Smith, Cooke, Taylor, Mason, Archer and Harper. Further complications arose when the old Gaelic names were transposed into English, thus Carey, derived from the Gaelic O`Ciardha, became Carew or even Carr.


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